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"On my part, I remain committed to the process of dialogue. It is my firm belief that dialogue and a willingness to look with honesty and clarity at the reality of Tibet can lead us to a viable solution."

Dalai Lama meets with Emory faculty to launch weekend of events

October 21, 2007

ATLANTA, Oct 19, (AP): Emory University faculty on Friday presented
the Dalai Lama with a science curriculum translated into Tibetan, an
effort to marry Western concepts with the Eastern tradition.

The textbook, which covers basic scienctific principles like gravity
and electromagnetism, is part of an initiative by Emory to teach
science to thousands of Tibetan monks and nuns living in exile in
India. About a dozen Emory faculty members and one Georgia Tech
professor have worked for a year on the curriculum.

"I am really impressed," the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader said in
English after the presentation. "I feel positive as we get closer to
the reality."

The meeting at the Ritz-Carlton in Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood
kicked off a weekend of events at Emory with the Dalai Lama, who has
accepted a distinguished professorship at the prestigious private
college.

His visit includes a conference on meditation and depression, a lesson
on the basics of Buddhism, a free public talk at Centennial Olympic
Park in downtown Atlanta and the first of many lectures to the Emory
community.

On Friday, dozens of followers dressed in brightly colored robes
waited outside the meeting room to greet the spiritual leader.

The audience inside the ballroom was a mix of dark business suits and
the bright red and gold robes worn by Tibetan monastics. A few
audience members meditated in their seats before the Dalai Lama's
arrival.

When the Dalai Lama entered, the room fell silent as audience members
stood and bowed.

Although the Dalai Lama has honorary professorships at universities
across the globe, Emory is the only place he has accepted a teaching
professorship. The Dalai Lama joins an already prestigious group of
high-profile professors at Emory, including former President Jimmy
Carter and author Salman Rushdie.

His appearance brought with it high security, including a Secret
Service detail who screened bags and checked IDs of those attending
Friday's meeting.

The Dalai Lama fled the Himalayan region for India in 1959 amid a
failed uprising against Chinese rule. He remains highly popular among
Tibetans, despite persistent efforts to demonize him by Chinese
authorities.

China claims Tibet has been its territory for centuries, but many
Tibetans say they were effectively independent for most of that
period.

Chinese officials lashed out angrily at the United States after the
Dalai Lama received Congress' highest civilian honor in an elaborate
ceremony on Wednesday. The Dalai Lama brushed the furious reaction
aside, saying he supports "genuine autonomy," not independence for
Tibet.

He told an audience gathered at a Washington hotel on Thursday that
Tibet, a poor, landlocked place with a small population, would enjoy
more prosperity within China than outside. But he said autonomy means
that Tibetans, not Chinese, must be allowed to make important
religious, cultural and economic decisions.

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