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"As long as human rights are violated, there can be no foundation for peace. How can peace grow where speaking the truth is itself a crime?"

China's marks 60th anniversary of invading eastern Tibet

October 25, 2010

Tibetan Review
October 20, 2010

China on October 19 marked the 60th anniversary
of its annexation of Chamdo, the capital of
eastern Tibet, with among other things, an
exhibition visited by about 1000 people from all
walks of life, according to China’s official
Xinhua news agency Oct 19. The exhibition
displayed Chamdo's past and present, with
hundreds of historic photos, publications in
Mandarin and Tibetan, sand tables and multimedia
presentations, a local official named Kelsang was cited as saying.

It was on October 19, 1950 that troops of the
Chinese People's Liberation Army marched into
Chamdo Prefecture, where the Tibetan government
had, despite the impending serious dangers, just
posted a very young and totally inexperienced man
named Ngapo Ngawang Jigme as its
Governor-General. He surrendered without a fight
and went on to occupy high ceremonial posts under
Chinese rule throughout his life.

Xinhua said the event was a precursor to the
peaceful liberation of entire Tibet in the
following year, apparently referring to the
coerced signing of the 17-point agreement in
Beijing on May 23, 1951, with the Tibetan side led by Ngapo.

Chamdo, a prefecture with 640,000 people, had,
from only mule-cart tracks in the 1950s, 9,164 km
of roads, covering 72.5 percent of villages, by
the end of last year, the report said. "We'll
build roads to all villages by 2020," Qi Fei,
Chinese chief of the local transport bureau was quoted as saying.

He has added that the Chinese government was
currently building an interprovincial highway
network to link Chamdo with all pivotal cities in
western China, including Lhasa, Chengdu, Xining and Kunming.
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