Join our Mailing List

"On my part, I remain committed to the process of dialogue. It is my firm belief that dialogue and a willingness to look with honesty and clarity at the reality of Tibet can lead us to a viable solution."

Chinese ambassador says Dalai Lama is 'lying'

March 28, 2008

OTTAWA 27 Mar 08 (AFP) — China's ambassador to Canada on Wednesday
accused the Dalai Lama of "lying" to the West and his inner circle of
being behind protests in Lhasa that have turned violent.

"The Dalai Lama has been telling lies to the world for decades to make
the Western public believe that what he says, whatever he says, is
truth. It's wrong," Ambassador Lu Shumin told reporters.

"He advocates for so-called peaceful demonstrations, non-violence ...
but have you seen anything he has done in that direction?"

The ambassador accused the Dalai Lama of "pretending to be a peaceful,
like an angel-type of figure." But, he added, "What has happened in
Tibet was instigated by separatist groups led by Dalai Lama clique."

Ambassador Lu pointed to alleged Internet postings late last year by
Tibetan separatist groups "closely linked" to the Tibetan
government-in-exile in India warning of the protests in March.

His torrent of criticism came as world leaders press Beijing for
restraint in the violence in Tibet that, according to Tibet's
government-in-exile, has claimed 140 dead, as well as the need for
consultation with representatives of the Dalai Lama.

Talks between the Chinese authorities and the Dalai Lama's envoys were
suspended since the summer of last year.

Ambassador Lu said: "The door is always open to the Dalai Lama for
dialogue ... as long as he gives up his idea of Tibet independence and
stops these activities and also recognizes Tibet is part of China and
Taiwan is part of China."

Lu then went on to challenge China's critics, saying its control of
Tibet had actually established respect for human rights, and likening
Tibet previously to "resembling life in medieval Europe."

He pointed out a German expedition that visited Lhasa in 1939 to study
Tibetan ways and see if they fit into the Nazi worldview.

"You will see the change (since then), and you will see ... who is
working for the protection and improvement of human rights and who is
not," Lu said.
CTC National Office 1425 René-Lévesque Blvd West, 3rd Floor, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3G 1T7
T: (514) 487-0665   ctcoffice@tibet.ca
Developed by plank