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"We Tibetans are looking for a legitimate and meaningful autonomy, an arrangement that would enable Tibetans to live within the framework of the People’s Republic of China."

Dalai Lama 'wolf in monk's robes'

April 3, 2008

By AUDRA ANG, AP
April 2, 2008


BEIJING -- China has branded the Dalai Lama a "wolf in monk's robes" and
his followers the "scum of Buddhism." It stepped up the rhetoric
yesterday, accusing the Nobel Peace laureate and his supporters of
planning suicide attacks.

The Tibetan government-in-exile swiftly denied the charge, and the U.S.
administration rushed to the Tibetan Buddhist leader's defence, calling
him "a man of peace."

"There is absolutely no indication that he wants to do anything other
than have a dialogue with China on how to discuss the serious issues
there," State Department spokesman Tom Casey said.

Wu Heping, spokesman for China's Ministry of Public Security, claimed
searches of monasteries in the Tibetan capital had turned up a large
cache of weapons. They included 176 guns, 13,013 bullets, 3,500
kilograms of explosives, 19,000 sticks of dynamite and 350 knives, he said.

"To our knowledge, the next plan of the Tibetan independence forces is
to organize suicide squads to launch violent attacks," Wu told a news
conference.

"They claimed that they fear neither bloodshed nor sacrifice."

Wu provided no details or evidence. He used the term "gan si dui," a
rarely used phrase directly translated as "dare-to-die corps." The
official English version of his remarks translated the term as "suicide
squads."

Wu said police had arrested an individual who he claimed was an
operative of the "Dalai Lama clique," responsible for gathering
intelligence and distributing pamphlets calling for an uprising.

Beijing has repeatedly accused the Dalai Lama and his supporters of
orchestrating violence in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital. Protests which
began peacefully there on the March 10 anniversary of a 1959 uprising
against Chinese rule spiralled out of control four days later.
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