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"As long as human rights are violated, there can be no foundation for peace. How can peace grow where speaking the truth is itself a crime?"

ICT delivers UN statement on illegal killings by security forces in Tibet

June 7, 2008

Save Tibet
June 5th, 2008

On 3 June, ICT delivered an oral statement at the UN Human Rights
Council in Geneva on the use of extrajudicial and summary executions
in Tibet. As ICT does not have an official status at the UN, the
statement was delivered under the name of France Libertés.
ICT's director for government relations in Europe, Stewart Watters,
delivered the oral statement in response to the report to the UN
Human Rights Council by the UN's Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial
and Summary Executions. ICT raised concerns about the shooting and
killing of civilians by Chinese security forces in Tibet during the
current crackdown, as well as the Chinese government's lack of
response to the UN on the killing of the 17 year old nun, Kelsang
Namtso, at the Nangpa Pass in September 2006:

"Mr. President, we raise this question due to further deterioration
of the human rights situation on the Tibetan Plateau with more than
200 Tibetans reported killed by Chinese security forces in the harsh
military crackdown to suppress the predominantly peaceful protests
over the past two months."

"In the absence of independent monitors, what interventions has the
Special Rapporteur undertaken with China, to seek clarifications on
these numerous, carefully documented reports of Tibetan deaths?" the
statement said.

The Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial and Summary Executions is an
independent expert appointed by the UN and is mandated to investigate
cases and raise concerns directly with governments where there are
credible reports of executions or use of lethal force by the state
without due legal process. In particular, the Rapporteur is to "pay
special attention to extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions
where the victims are individuals who are carrying out peaceful
activities in defense of human rights and fundamental freedoms" (UN
resolution 1996/74).


The full text of the statement follows:
--------------------
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
Eighth Session
Item 3

REPORT OF SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTRAJUDICIAL OR SUMMARY EXECUTIONS
(Interactive Dialogue)

Oral statement by France Libertés, delivered by Stewart WATTERS.

Mr. President.

While fully acknowledging Mr. Alston's report, we remain concerned by
situations where, as a result of repressive government policies,
there is a total absence of independent monitors, human rights
defender and/or independent civil society organizations. We are
concerned by the extent to which such conditions enable acts of
impunity by authoritarian regimes and that the ability of Inquiry
Commissions to bring the perpetrators to justice is highly unlikely
to be realized.

With regard to the 30 September 2006 killing of at least one Tibetan
minor, a nun aged 17, by Chinese security forces at the Nangpa Pass
on the Nepal border, the Special Rapporteur requested the Chinese
authorities "to make sure that there is full public accountability
for the actions of the State and of its border military patrols by
ensuring that the result of your official investigation be made
public." We, therefore, wish to know what specific response the
Special Rapporteur received from the Chinese authorities.

Mr. President, we raise this question due to further deterioration of
the human rights situation on the Tibetan Plateau with more than 200
Tibetans reported killed by Chinese security forces in the harsh
military crackdown to suppress the predominantly peaceful protests
over the past two months. According to one report, on 28 March more
than 80 bodies were burnt together at an electrical crematorium in
one county under Lhasa Municipality. Other individuals report army
trucks leaving Lhasa carrying scores of dead bodies.

The International Campaign for Tibet reports that Kirti Monastery in
Sichuan Province has been surrounded by Chinese security forces since
March 16 and the local community has not been allowed access after
large public demonstrations were held there that resulted in mass
detentions and the deaths of at least 10 Tibetans, including monks
and three high school students. Images of those killed were broadcast
by news media around the world. On April 3, government troops fired
upon protestors from Tongkor (Chinese: Donggu) monastery 60
kilometers from Kardze (Chinese: Ganzi) town, killing at least ten to
15 people, 3 of whom were monks, 6 were women and one was a child. We
have reports of people being arrested, severely beaten and tortured,
then being hastily released to their family to die at home from their
injuries, out of police custody. On 28 May in Kardze (Chinese: Ganzi)
county of Sichuan province, the Tibetan Center for Human Rights and
Democracy reports that security forces opened fire on a female
Tibetan student staging a peaceful and solitary protest – she was
later seen wounded and being dragged by security forces - we do not
know her condition at this time.

These shocking reports have emerged at great individual risk from a
Tibet under complete lockdown. Foreign diplomats, NGOs and media are
still not allowed to travel freely to Tibet. In the absence of
independent monitors, what interventions has the Special Rapporteur
undertaken with China, to seek clarifications on these numerous,
carefully documented reports of Tibetan deaths?

I thank you, Mr. President.

2 June, 2008
CTC National Office 1425 René-Lévesque Blvd West, 3rd Floor, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3G 1T7
T: (514) 487-0665   ctcoffice@tibet.ca
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