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"Canada can, within a positive friendly atmosphere, ask the Chinese government to resolve the Tibetan situation."

Beijing's "Welcome" Editorials: Choice for Dalai Lama

July 2, 2008

Special report: Tibet: Its Past and Present
Xinhua / ChinaView  (People's Republic of China)
July 1, 2008

* * *
The choice for Dalai Lama
By Yi Yan

The Summer Beijing Olympic Games is drawing near to us, and the
curtain of the world-focusing gala sports party will be pulled in
about a month's time. I think that it is very possible that after the
Olympic Games, Dalai Lama will fade in influence in the eyes of the
Western countries. What the West cares is not only the growing
economic power of China, but also the increasing political and
diplomatic influence of this Oriental dynamic country. It is safe to
say that China counts much more, in comparison with Dalai Lama, in
anyone's mind.

China's central government is now willing to hold talks with him. I
strongly suggest that Dalai Lama ought to grasp this chance, and
respond positively towards the central government. If he continues to
put on another political show on the world stage, the chance is
likely to slip away. We have listened to what he has spoken lately,
including those "soft speeches", but his faithfulness is
questionable. Therefore, if the Dalai Lama really cares about this
chance of negotiation with the central government, he needs to make
up his mind, and trade good with good in action.

I am bewildered by Dalai Lama's recent speeches and political shows,
which makes me quite suspicious of and not sure of his true
intentions. If the Dalai Lama wrongly gauges the support the West
gives him, and takes for granted the good intentions of the Chinese
central government, or tries to seek a prey that is beyond reason, or
even encourage and instigate his radical Tibetan followers to engage
in violence, once again, Beijing will surely be enraged. Under that
circumstance, it will force the central government to give up on him,
once and all. There exists such advocacy in the central government now.

* * *
What to talk with Dalai Lama?
By Yi Gu

Seems a new round of talks between the Beijing central government and
the Dalai Lama will start soon. Then, what are the topics on the
table? Is it the current situation of Tibet, position of Tibet,
future of Tibet, or the destiny of the Tibetan people, of course NOT.

The reason is simple. Dalai is a Buddhist lama, his past political
status was based on the system of theocracy. The system, in which a
society is ruled by a priest or monk who represent a god, has been
abolished in Tibet long before. So if one is going to discuss with a
monk the position and future of Tibet, and destiny of Tibetan people,
doesn't that give an impression that China will allow theocracy to
resume in Tibet?

Tibet is an autonomous region of China, and representing it is the
government of the Tibetan Autonomous Region. The 14th Dalai Lama has
set up an "exile regime" in Dharmsala, India, and he claims to be the
leader of the exile regime. The fact is that not a single state in
the world today admits the legitimacy of Dalai Lama's exile
government in Dharmsala. If the central government is going to
discuss the position, future of Tibet, and destiny of Tibetan people,
doesn't that give an impression that Dharmasala exile regime is legitimate?

Tibet has achieved a lot in the past 50-odd years, but Tibet's
success and progress has nothing to do with the Dalai Lama. He by no
means can represent Tibet or the Tibetan people now. So, China's
central government is not going to discuss with Dalai Lama the
current situation of Tibet, position of Tibet, future of Tibet, or
the destiny of the Tibetan people, but only the future and destiny of
Dalai Lama himself.

* * *
Last Opportunity for Dalai Lama
By Yi Yan

The 14th Dalai Lama is running out of opportunities. And that's why
he is using the Beijing Olympics as his last straw. But could he
really make the best use of this opportunity? Some Westerners are
providing Dalai Lama with badly-needed guidance and support, which
shed light on why he frequented Western countries in a rush. However,
there are vast differences in the interest of those Westerners' and
Dalai's, which can be seen through the fact that Dalai has been given
a cold shoulder by the West from time to time in the past decades.

Therefore Dalai should tell the difference in interests and stop
binding himself to certain political forces, which will lead to his
loss of opportunities. Judging from the current situation, Dalai Lama
is losing his most important opportunities on mending ties with the
Chinese central government.

Of course, it remained to be seen whether Dalai Lama still has any
power and influence to muster, without the support of some political
forces in the West.

* * *
Last Opportunity for Dalai Lama
By Yi Yan

The 14th Dalai Lama is running out of opportunities. And that's why
he is using the Beijing Olympics as his last straw. But could he
really make the best use of this opportunity? Some Westerners are
providing Dalai Lama with badly-needed guidance and support, which
shed light on why he frequented Western countries in a rush. However,
there are vast differences in the interest of those Westerners' and
Dalai's, which can be seen through the fact that Dalai has been given
a cold shoulder by the West from time to time in the past decades.

Therefore Dalai should tell the difference in interests and stop
binding himself to certain political forces, which will lead to his
loss of opportunities. Judging from the current situation, Dalai Lama
is losing his most important opportunities on mending ties with the
Chinese central government.

Of course, it remained to be seen whether Dalai Lama still has any
power and influence to muster, without the support of some political
forces in the West.
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