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"On my part, I remain committed to the process of dialogue. It is my firm belief that dialogue and a willingness to look with honesty and clarity at the reality of Tibet can lead us to a viable solution."

Beijing Olympics: the end of an era

July 24, 2008

Dr Zhengxu Wang, a senior research fellow in the University's China
Policy Institute, says that to claim a legitimate place in the global
community, China needs to begin to realise that there is currently a
huge perception gap lying between East and West.
Media-Newswire.com
July 23, 2008

The Beijing Olympics and the associated global controversy will mark
the end of an era in which the Chinese people can ignore the opinions
of the Western world, says an expert at The University of Nottingham.

Dr Zhengxu Wang, a senior research fellow in the University's China
Policy Institute, says that to claim a legitimate place in the global
community, China needs to begin to realise that there is currently a
huge perception gap lying between East and West.

But, he warns, international 'China-bashing' over the country's
handling of the Olympic protests and events in Tibet will only lead
to confrontation and further division.

Writing in a new online blog section on the China Policy Institute
website, Dr Wang said: "Furthermore, for the rest of the world to
bring about changes in China, it must realise that confrontations,
blaming, or shaming China (whether its government or its people) will
never work. This round of China-bashing has only produced anger among
its people.

"The West needs to realise that China has a legitimate place in the
world. It needs to work with China as members of a global community
that gives China due respect.

"For China, the era in which it could afford to ignore the opinions
of the rest of the world has come to an end. To claim its legitimate
place in the global community, China now needs to come to the
realisation that there is a huge perception gap lying between the two
sides. It is time that China begins to understand the values and
beliefs of others."

Dr Wang says that the Chinese people see the Olympic Games, due to
start in August, as a way of showcasing China's achievements and
establishing its status as a great nation, so were perplexed — and
later angry -- when protests began to gather momentum last year.

He believes that much of the Western world's misgivings about China
stem from a general unease about the country's rise to global
superpower. "In the eyes of many people, China imports too much,
exports too much, produces too much, consumes too much and pollutes
too much. With its large-scale real and potential impacts, China
cannot but arouse great anxieties: How would we fare if this giant
goes out of control?" he asks.

In the end, he argues, it is the confrontation of ideas between East
and West that will lead to soul-searching among the Chinese people,
allowing China to become truly open and achieve mutual understanding
and acceptance with the rest of the world.

The China Policy Institute is a think-tank dedicated to building a
more informed dialogue between China and the rest of the world which
produces quality analysis in the fields of international relations,
economics, business, politics, the environment and society. It is
part of The School of Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University
of Nottingham, the UK's only academic institution centred on the
study of modern China.

A full version of Dr Wang's blog, along with others from academics
centred on topical subjects such as media reporting following the
Sichuan earthquake, the Chinese Government's stance on Tibet and
China and the credit crunch in the West, can be viewed on the web at
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/china-policy-institute/

-----------------
Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham is ranked in the UK's
Top 10 and the World's Top 70 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong
( SJTU ) and Times Higher ( THES ) World University Rankings.

It provides innovative and top quality teaching, undertakes
world-changing research, and attracts talented staff and students
from 150 nations. Described by The Times as Britain's "only truly
global university", it has invested continuously in award-winning
campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. Twice since 2003
its research and teaching academics have won Nobel Prizes. The
University has won the Queen's Award for Enterprise in both 2006 (
International Trade ) and 2007 ( Innovation — School of Pharmacy ).

Its students are much in demand from 'blue-chip' employers. Winners
of Students in Free Enterprise for four years in succession, and
current holder of UK Graduate of the Year, they are accomplished
artists, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, innovators and
fundraisers. Nottingham graduates consistently excel in business, the
media, the arts and sport. Undergraduate and postgraduate degree
completion rates are amongst the highest in the United Kingdom.

More information is available from Dr Zhengxu Wang on +44 ( 0 )115
823 2117 or +44 ( 0 )115 846 6322, zhengxu.wang@nottingham.ac.uk or
Emma Thorne, Media Relations Manager in the Communications Office at
The University of Nottingham, on +44 ( 0 )115 951 5793,
emma.thorne@nottingham.ac.uk
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