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"On my part, I remain committed to the process of dialogue. It is my firm belief that dialogue and a willingness to look with honesty and clarity at the reality of Tibet can lead us to a viable solution."

The Dalai Lama: Life in Exile

March 15, 2009

March 12, 2009

Extensive coverage on Tibet on Al-Jazeera network

Inside Story: Tibet’s struggle for autonomy March 10th, 2009
http://www.youtube.com/watch”v=F1WsDSDopwU
http://www.youtube.com/watch”v=rYndxDbmzHE

101 East: Dalai Lama “ Life in Exile, March 12, 2009
http://www.youtube.com/watch”v=bAHHqA-VNUY
http://www.youtube.com/watch”v=rd7EycB5-do

Around the world millions of Tibetans are living in exile, having fled
Chinese rule.

Leading their struggles for the last 50 years is one of the world's most
recognised spiritual leaders - the Dalai Lama.

This March marks 50 years since the Tibetan uprising against China
failed and the Dalai Lama went into exile in India.

It also marks one year since Tibet's capital Lhasa was rocked by violence.

A massive Chinese security presence in Tibet and other parts of western
China in the run-up to the anniversary appear to have successfully
prevented any large-scale protests from breaking out.

But around the world, the anniversary was marked by protests with
Tibetan exiles and supporters calling for an end to China's rule over
the Himalayan region in cities across the US, Asia and Europe.

For 50 years, Tibetans have looked to their exiled leader for guidance
in their approach to China. He has continually emphasised a non-violent,
diplomatic "Middle Way", as he gently pushed for Tibetan autonomy under
China's government.

But younger Tibetans, frustrated by Chinese rule are instigating a more
aggressive approach which they hope will lead to Tibet's independence.

Recently, the 73-year-old has expressed his wish to retire as Tibet's
spiritual leader and indicated that he had all but given up on
negotiations with China over autonomy for Tibet.

This week, 101 East speaks exclusively to the Dalai Lama about Tibet's
future, his dialogue with China, the "Middle Way" and his life in exile.
CTC National Office 1425 René-Lévesque Blvd West, 3rd Floor, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3G 1T7
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