Join our Mailing List

"Canada can, within a positive friendly atmosphere, ask the Chinese government to resolve the Tibetan situation."

Tibetans living in great distress: Dalai Lama

April 3, 2009

The Times of India
April 1, 2009

DELHI, India -- The Dalai Lama speaks during a
news conference in New Delhi on 31 March 2009
marking 50 years since the failed uprising against Chinese rule

The Dalai Lama speaks during a news conference in
New Delhi on 31 March 2009 marking 50 years since
the failed uprising against Chinese rule and his
flight into exile in India. He accused the
Chinese government of painting a rosy picture of
Tibet when actually, Tibetans living there are in
great distress.Reuters/B Mathur/India

Speaking on the occasion of the completion of 50
years of his stay in exile in India, Dalai Lama
on Tuesday accused the Chinese government of
painting a rosy picture of Tibet when actually,
as he claimed, Tibetans living there were in great distress.

The spiritual leader, who claimed that he had no
regrets about any decision he made during the
past 50 years, said the problem with China was
that it was focusing more on discrediting him
rather than on the main issue of the rights of 6 million Tibetans.

"The real problem is that Chinese government
continues to insist that the issue is Dalai Lama
and not the rights of Tibetans. They say there is
no problem even when there are 50 tanks in Lhasa
ready to shoot any time. I want to appeal to the
Chinese government to allow international media
to visit Tibet and see for themselves the plight
of the people," Dalai Lama said.

Dalai Lama, who prayed at eight separate
religious places in Delhi on Tuesday to thank
India for its support, also emphasised on ahimsa
and compassion saying that India had been the
source of Tibet’s rich civilisational heritage.
Asked about Tibetans resorting to violence to
meet their demands, he said more than 99% of Tibetans believed in non-violence.

On reports about hacking of computers of the
Tibetan government-in-exile and other countries
through Chinese servers, Dalai Lama said the
matter should be investigated. He said China
seemed to have information beforehand even about
his movements. "You should investigate. If you
don’t have money, borrow it but please investigate," he said.

He also brushed aside the recent denial of visa
to him by South Africa, which led to the
cancellation of an international conference
there, saying that the development brought him
good publicity. He said he was grateful to China
as their protests against his travel plans had
given much publicity to the Tibetan cause.

"Ultimately, I have to thank the Chinese
government. Because of their protests we have got
publicity,” he said pointing out that had he
visited South Africa, his visit may have gone
unnoticed. In an apparent reference to the
economic downturn, he said market forces and
greed were responsible for the crisis.

On the dialogue with China, Samdhong Rinpoche,
the prime minister of the Tibetan
government-in-exile, said he was looking forward
to pursue the process but no dates had been
suggested for the next round of talks. He said it
would take time, just like India’s border
disputes. The Dalai Lama prayed for India at
eight different shrines, including the Laxmi
Narayan temple, Nizamuddin dargah, the Cathedral
Church of Redemption and Judah Synagogue.
CTC National Office 1425 René-Lévesque Blvd West, 3rd Floor, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3G 1T7
T: (514) 487-0665   ctcoffice@tibet.ca
Developed by plank