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"On my part, I remain committed to the process of dialogue. It is my firm belief that dialogue and a willingness to look with honesty and clarity at the reality of Tibet can lead us to a viable solution."

Tibet in History this Week

May 12, 2009

Tibetan Review
May 11, 2009

May 12, 1980: A UNI report cited the Soviet
Oriental Institute as saying in a paper that
China had turned Tibet into a springboard for
laying claims over Himalayan territories of its
southern neighbours. It also called the Chinese
move to get the Dalai Lama back to Tibet as being
designed to consolidate it hold on Tibet.

May 14, 1992: The United States began the process
to accept 1,000 Tibetan refugees in India, Nepal
and Bhutan under a Tibetan Refugees Resettlement Programme.

May 14, 1995: The Dalai Lama announced at a press
conference in New Delhi his formal recognition of
Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, a six-year-old boy from a
semi-nomadic family in Lhari County of Nagchu
Prefecture, Tibet, as the reincarnation of the 10th Panchen Lama.

May 17, 1988: Nuns from Ghari nunnery
demonstrated in front of the Jhokhang Temple,
Lhasa. Four persons were reportedly shot dead in the ensuing police crackdown.

May 17, 1995: China's official Xinhua news agency
carried a scathing attack on the Dalai Lama from
a spokesman of China's Bureau of Religious
Affairs, calling his recognition of Gedhun
Choekyi Nyima as the reincarnation of the 10th
Panchen Lama illegal and accusing him of
disregarding "fixed historical convention,
undermining religious rituals". China then went
on to select five-year-old Gyaltsen Norbu, whose
parents were both communist party members, as its
official 11th Panchen Lama. China recently
organized its Second World Buddhist Forum and
used the occasion to promote his acceptability
among the Buddhist religious leaders and scholars from around the world.

May 1955: Many refugees from Kham and Amdo
streamed into Central Tibet following large-scale
atrocities by invading Chinese troops.

May 1958: Deng Xiaoping, the Secretary of the
Chinese Communist Party Central Committee,
formally approved the construction of the site
for China's Northwest Nuclear Weapons Research
and Design Academy (the Ninth Academy) in Haibai
(Tibetan: Tsojang) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province.

May 1980: The Tibetan government in exile sent to
Tibet a second and a third fact-finding missions,
made up of youngsters and educationists, respectively.

May 1982: Over 115 Tibetan political activists
were arrested and were branded as "delinquents" and "black marketeers".

May 1990: China announces new plans for birth
control in Tibet, underscoring ongoing reports of
forced abortion and sterilisation of Tibetan women as well as infanticide.

May 1994: US President Bill Clinton delinked
human rights from consideration of granting Most
Favoured Nation (MFN) trading status to communist China.

May 1996: Monks of Gaden Monastery in Tibet
clashed with the Chinese police when the latter
came to confiscate the photos of the Dalai Lama.
More than 60 monks were arrested.
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