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"As long as human rights are violated, there can be no foundation for peace. How can peace grow where speaking the truth is itself a crime?"

After Dalai Lama's rebuke, China breathes fire

November 11, 2009

Times Now
November 9, 2009

A day after both the Indian government and the
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama openly
took a swipe at China, the Dragon has issued a
veiled but audacious threat to India.

In its state-run paper the People's Daily, China
has said that India seems to have forgotten the lessons of 1962 war.

In a provocative article lashing out at India,
China also said that Dalai Lama was being used by
the Indian government to further its own agenda.

Here is what the People's daily has said, warning
of a potential war-like situation: "India may
have forgotten the lesson of 1962, when its
repeated provocation resulted in military clashes
warning. India is on this wrong track again."

Attacking the Dalai Lama for his visit to Tawang,
China has also accused the Indian government of
using the Dalai Lama to push its own agenda and
has once again warned that when the conflict gets
sharper and sharper, the Chinese government will
have to face it and solve it “in a way India has designed.”

"The Dalai Lama went to southern Tibet at this
critical moment probably because of pressure from
India. By doing so, he can please the country
that has hosted him for years. The appearance and
activities of the Dalai Lama in southern Tibet
may foment anti-China sentiment among people
living in the region. When the conflict gets
sharper and sharper, the Chinese government will
have to face it and solve it in a way India has
designed,” a Chinese analyst Hu Shisheng, a
researcher of Southern Asian studies at the China
Institutes of Contemporary International Relations, said Sunday (November 9).

"India may make use of the Dalai Lama to solve
the decade-long territorial conflict by
encouraging his visit to southern Tibet."

"The appearance and activities of the Dalai Lama
in southern Tibet may foment anti-China sentiment
among people living in the region, Hu said.

During his visit to a remote, high-altitude
Tibetan monastery in the southern Tibet region
Sunday, the Dalai Lama spoke out against China
and in a move unusual for him made a politically loaded statement.

"My stand that Tawang is an integral part of
India has not changed", the Dalai Lama said in
defence of his host country. On the Tibetan
question, he said, "the Tibetan spirit in Tibet
is very strong. On the other hand, China has taken a hard line."

The visit took place amid reports of major
military build-ups on both sides of the border.

On the other hand, foreign policy experts say
India has stuck to its position even though the
communist nation has been asserting itself on the issue.

Former National Security Advisor Brajesh Mishra
said India has done what it had been doing on the issue in the past.

"India has done what it has been doing in the
past. Chinese are asserting their position. Our
stated position is that as long as Dalai Lama
does not involve himself in political activity,
he is free to visit any part of the country he wants," he said.

Mishra, however, added that the only new thing in
the whole issue is that Chinese have strongly
started asserting their position on the issue.

Asked whether India has strongly asserted its
position on Arunachal Pradesh, he said, "neither
have we strongly asserted nor we have made any
new position. We have maintained our position."

Meanwhile Finance Minister has said the only way
to solve disputes between the two countries was
through tough dialogue. Mukherjee acknowledged
that there were still certain issues between
Indian and China pertaining to the border
dispute. The minister, however, said all such
disputes will be resolved with China through talks.

"The actual resolution of dispute is yet to take
place and there is still some divergence of
views," he said adding India does not visualise
any conflict on border issues with China and that
bilateral trade between the two countries is expanding fast.
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