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"As long as human rights are violated, there can be no foundation for peace. How can peace grow where speaking the truth is itself a crime?"

"Struggle mainly between Tibet and China"

March 2, 2010

Express News Service (India)
February 27, 2010

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM --  The recent meeting between
US president Barack Obama and the Dalai Lama has
rekindled hopes of a new era in Sino-Tibetan
relations among many, but the Tibetan struggle is
primarily a matter between Tibet and China, the
Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje said here on Friday.

Talking to reporters at the Sai Gramam,
Thonnackal, where he is on a three-day visit, the
Karmapa Lama said through his American
interpreter: "President Obama is not the first US
President to meet the Dalai Lama. But since he is
the first African-American US president, some
people hope he would herald a new era in equality," he said.

But the Tibetan struggle, he stated, "is a matter
largely between Tibet and China.’’ One of the
senior-most Tibetan spiritual leaders, the
Karmapa Lama heads one of the four schools of
Tibetan Buddhism, the Kagyu. Born in 1985, the
present Karmapa was ‘discovered’ as the 17th in
the lineage at the age of seven. He escaped to India in 1999.

The Karmapa expressed gratitude to the Indian
Government for providing the Tibetan community
refuge and in allowing it to preserve its
culture. To a question why he decided to leave
China-controlled Tibet, he said that had he
stayed on, he would have been restricted in his religious duties as Karmapa.

Also, his education was suffering as masters
could not come to Tibet from India for his
instruction, and he could not travel to India to seek them out.

Ogyen Trinley Dorje arrived here on Thursday. The
Karmapa will inaugurate a small Buddhist temple
at the Sai Gramam on Saturday morning, before
leaving for Dharamsala via New Delhi.
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